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3D Printing Nintendo LABO Waveform Cards

This is just genius. 3D printing wave forms to create different types of sound via the Nintendo Switch piano. Go check out his blog.

Reviving Quake 3 In 2018

I stumbled into this blog post about quake3 arena. I remembered that I had the original CD somewhere in a deep and dark dungeon. I dugged it up and figured how to bring it to the 21st century.

ioquake is a great project.

Stop calling your wife crazy during arguments

“If we look at how we show up and fight in our relationship, it says a lot more about ourselves than it does about the person we’re calling crazy, even if your partner is acting in a way you find crazy,” Klow says. “How might it be possible to instead show up as compassionate and understanding and work toward greater clarity?”

It isn’t easy, Klow admits. Arguments trigger the fight or flight response in the brain, and when we fight, our prefrontal cortex, the part that controls reasoning, problem solving and language, goes “offline,” he says. So often when people fight, they try to manipulate the narrative or framework of the conversation, usually unconsciously, because they’re feeling threatened. In other words: Delegitimizing your partner’s feelings, is a cop-out when you don’t want to deal.

Yep.

Productivity

My system has three key pillars: “Make sure to get the important shit done”, “Don’t waste time on stupid shit”, and “make a lot of lists”.

Sounds good to me. Sam Altman has a few other productivity tips. Check his website for more.

The Gambler Who Cracked The Horse-Racing Code

What a great story by Businessweek Kit Chellel:

Across the road from Happy Valley, 27 floors up, two Americans sat in a plush office, ignoring a live feed of the action that played mutely on a TV screen. The only sound was the hum of a dozen computers. Bill Benter and an associate named Paul Coladonato had their eyes fixed on a bank of three monitors, which displayed a matrix of bets their algorithm had made on the race—51,381 in all. Benter and Coladonato watched as a software script filtered out the losing bets, one at a time, until there were 36 lines left on the screens. Thirty-five of their bets had correctly called the finishers in two of the races, qualifying for a consolation prize. And one wager had correctly predicted all nine horses. “F—-,” Benter said. “We hit it.”

If iPads were meant for kids

I also am a parent of two kids with iPads and Dave’s post about parental control resonated with me. I agree with everything he said in his post. To be able to make a category of apps disappear during homework hour would be awesome. Having the iPad auto-shutdown at a certain time and not being able to start without entering the parent password would be sublime. Thanks Dave for writing this and I surely hope Apple listens. Go check out his article, he has more ideas to bring forward.

How to keep your ISP’s nose out of your browser history with encrypted DNS

The death of network neutrality and the loosening of regulations on how Internet providers handle customers’ network traffic have raised many concerns over privacy. Internet providers (and others watching traffic as it passes over the Internet) have long had a tool that allows them to monitor individuals’ Internet habits with ease: their Domain Name System (DNS) servers. And if they haven’t been cashing in on that data already (or using it to change how you see the Internet), they likely soon will.

DNS services are the phone books of the Internet, providing the actual Internet Protocol (IP) network address associated with websites’ and other Internet services’ host and domain names. They turn arstechnica.com into 50.31.169.131, for example. Your Internet provider offers up DNS as part of your service, but your provider could also log your DNS traffic—in essence, recording your entire browsing history.

A game of tag that’s been going for 20+ years

How cool is that. I didn’t expect the newly released movie to be based on a true story. Fun times! Thank you Jason for bringing this up.

How to fall asleep in 2 minutes or less

Yet the ability to fall asleep in two minutes or less, anywhere, anytime, is actually a skill like any other, and one anyone can learn. The technique for how to do so was in fact developed for Naval aviators during World War II, and today we’ll share it with you.

Making Light of the “Dark Web” (and Debunking the FUD)

A great article explaining and debunking the idea of deep web.